Corpus Callosum
Unlike a great deal of you who have probably been waiting with bated breath for this book, I had no idea what I was delving into when I opened it. And I must say I was very impressed with what I found.
It is novels like this that remind me that women invented science fiction. That we were the first to birth these worlds of the probably improbable and put them into words.
Corpus Callosum is a story of life and death and the space that lies between. It follows a young woman named Jeanette and her sister, Joey, recently deceased. But kept to live on forever in a box that holds all her memory and personality in code. An imperfect chassis.
The thing that strikes me so deeply about this work is that it manages to exist where not very many writers of this genre place their stories. Usually in fiction that deals with the future, the created world and its technology have been nearly perfected. Any glitches or anomalies are rare and no one expects them. Corpus Callosum, on the other hand, is The Future: Version 1.0. The test run. Where technology hasn’t yet caught up to the majesty of the human mind and perfection is just a goal on a sheet of paper. 
Each moment spent with the sisters pulls you between the pedestrian goings on of every day life— like visiting family and reminiscing with friends and having a shag with an attractive man— and the horrifying repercussions of the second type of life that this future world offers. 
I enjoyed every second boxed up in the mind of Joey, and felt her resentment, fear and anger just as harshly as my own.
If you’re familiar with the discussions regarding AI, chassis, robotics, and the like, or looking for a compelling read I’d definitely give it a look.
Corpus Callosum is available free to tumblr users as a downloadable file: Here
But I’d also hop on over to Amazon to support Erika D. Price and leave a review. 

Corpus Callosum

Unlike a great deal of you who have probably been waiting with bated breath for this book, I had no idea what I was delving into when I opened it. And I must say I was very impressed with what I found.

It is novels like this that remind me that women invented science fiction. That we were the first to birth these worlds of the probably improbable and put them into words.

Corpus Callosum is a story of life and death and the space that lies between. It follows a young woman named Jeanette and her sister, Joey, recently deceased. But kept to live on forever in a box that holds all her memory and personality in code. An imperfect chassis.

The thing that strikes me so deeply about this work is that it manages to exist where not very many writers of this genre place their stories. Usually in fiction that deals with the future, the created world and its technology have been nearly perfected. Any glitches or anomalies are rare and no one expects them. Corpus Callosum, on the other hand, is The Future: Version 1.0. The test run. Where technology hasn’t yet caught up to the majesty of the human mind and perfection is just a goal on a sheet of paper. 

Each moment spent with the sisters pulls you between the pedestrian goings on of every day life— like visiting family and reminiscing with friends and having a shag with an attractive man— and the horrifying repercussions of the second type of life that this future world offers. 

I enjoyed every second boxed up in the mind of Joey, and felt her resentment, fear and anger just as harshly as my own.

If you’re familiar with the discussions regarding AI, chassis, robotics, and the like, or looking for a compelling read I’d definitely give it a look.

Corpus Callosum is available free to tumblr users as a downloadable file: Here

But I’d also hop on over to Amazon to support Erika D. Price and leave a review.