zdarsky:

AND THE TOBACCO INDUSTRY COLLAPSED THE END

what is he talking about
he doesn’t even have lips
all he has is a food slash 

zdarsky:

AND THE TOBACCO INDUSTRY COLLAPSED THE END

what is he talking about

he doesn’t even have lips

all he has is a food slash 

hyperjuder:

kaylapocalypse

They aren’t detailed and they’re not scary and they are kind of similar but I took your request as an assignment because I wanted to doodle.

these are so perfect and cute wowowowowowowowwowowowowowow

i love them.

Guys

something maybe really exciting is happening and I’m not going to tell you all yet because my fingers are still crossed

but the exciting thing means that I’m going to be really busy for the next four days. 

So if I told you I’d do a thing or If you’re waiting for me to do a thing  or If you messaged me and I haven’t gotten back to you or I haven’t done the thing yet. Its because of Reasons. 

and I’m really sorry.

But, if this works out, everyone will be screaming and I might actually cry. 

That sort of stuff. 

dashedlines:

AKTa-09-01 / Elijah Porter (by _ElijahPorter)

dashedlines:

AKTa-09-01 / Elijah Porter (by _ElijahPorter)

Why I dislike The Fault in Our Stars

motherhenna:

So, I’ve been getting a lot of asks over the last few months asking why I strongly dislike TFIOS by John Green as much as I do. And for the most part, all the recent askers have been surprisingly polite, considering the more aggressive ones I’ve received in the past on the subject. Anyway, I’ve answered a bunch of them separately, but I’ve decided to condense all of my theories, opinions and arguments into one succinct post.

Read More

hmmmm

lovelybookcovers:

A 3D slipcase!

lovelybookcovers:

A 3D slipcase!

Do any of you know how to draw scary monsters?

Somebody draw me some scary monsters

preferably on notebook paper with lines

They don’t even have to be super good just detailed and really scary.

<3

richincolor:

#thingswithmorepeopleofcolorthanbookcon on twitter

Beta Reading 201

mrnelson007:

mariahewilsonpoet:

How To Be An Awesome Beta Reader

If you read my Beta Reading 101 post you’ll know that I quickly touched on some qualities that good beta readers have. I decided to go a bit further into detail and expand upon that post so others can improve upon their beta reading abilities.

There are a few rules I follow when I beta read for someone.

1) Never beta read something that doesn’t interest you. Even if they say they can’t find anyone else, you’re not going to be able to offer great advice if it’s something that won’t hold your interest and you’ll probably end up breaking rule #2.

2) Don’t commit just to quit. Following through is everything. Unless disaster strikes, don’t commit to doing something if you’re not going to follow through with it. There is nothing worse than sending your stuff to people only to never hear from them again. Offer a time line and try to stick to it. Think you can effectively beta read a book in three weeks? Great, tell them three weeks. If you get done sooner, that’s just a bonus. Don’t say you can do it in a weekend and respond back two months later.

3) Don’t be shy. Mark up their manuscript. I do. I use fancy colours. I highlight things I like and say I like them. I point out minor errors like punctuation, spelling, and grammar. I point out character inconsistencies and plot holes. I point out dialogue that doesn’t sound right. I ask questions. I give a big chunk of feedback at the end about my overall impression and experience reading their book. Literally everything I think to comment on, I comment on. Good or bad. It’s the only way I feel one can be truly helpful. And if there’s something I don’t like, but it’s one of those things that really depends on personal preference, I point it out anyway, and comment that I don’t like it because of my own personal preference.

4) If you’re a few chapters in and the thing is such a mess that your eyeballs are bleeding, give it a quick skim (basically skip #3) and see if you can’t offer some advice on how to fix the larger issues and offer to have another, more detailed look, when those larger issues are fixed. If entire scenes are going to go, and entire plots need to be fixed, there is little use in spending hours doing a detailed read.

5) Don’t be cruel. You’re not going to be reading Stephen King or Dean Koontz. You’re going to be reading unpolished material. There’s no need to roast people and flame their work. You can say things don’t work without being a jerk. There is also no need to tell the author that he/she is the next J.K. Rowling. Seriously, they’re not. Rowling was a phenomenon. This goes for comparisons to any big name author. Don’t do it. Do offer encouragement, which brings me to #6.

6) Offer encouragement. Point out the things you like. Point out the scenes that work. Let the writer know what they’re doing right. Too often beta readers look for only the bad and neglect pointing out the good. Point out the good.

7) Have fun. Yes, that’s right. Have fun. The minute you’re no longer having fun being a beta reader, don’t be one. Beta reading is great fun, but it’s also great work. When you’re tired of it, stop and take a break. A tired beta reader is a bad beta reader.

Well, that’s it. I think that’s all there is to it. Do you think I missed anything? Does anyone have any questions for me?

I think this is good advice, although I’m not sure I entirely agree with #1. I think a beta reader who doesn’t enjoy the material can be extremely valuable - don’t be a jerk, of course, and do try to finish if you can, but every writer needs someone who can give them their honest opinion, and the “outsiders” perspective is very valuable.