The Legend of The Golden Raven

kaylapocalypse:

A found piece.

.

Long ago, when the earth was wild, there were two kings:

The King of the Wood and The Wicker King.

They were brothers, and their kingdoms lay side by side, shuttered away behind a wall.

The two kings were fair and just, mischievous and fond of sport. They were generous, brave and well loved by their people. It was a golden age, where the fruit hung ever-ripe from the trees and milk animals grew fat and plenty.

Every year in midsummer, when the second sun was highest in the sky, there was a Great Hunt.  All the eligible men and women joined together to go out into the wildlands to capture a great beast out of the dark for the midsummer feast.

The darkness seethed and roiled outside the country wall. It was a wild hungry thing of sorcery that had been banished by The Champion and the capital council in the days of old, five hundred seasons past. It was held back from swallowing them all by the country’s greatest boon, a living stone: The Rapturous Blue. 

The Rapturous Blue was kept in the center of the country between both kingdoms, balanced on a golden stand. It shone brilliantly and the country thrived beneath the protection of its light.

There was nothing in the darkness beyond the gates, but woods, waste, beasts and the most fearsome thing of all:The Cloven King. 
Ruler of the far reaches, and user of accursed magic that rotted and scorched his lands as thoroughly as it had his own flesh.

But, now wasn’t the time for such thoughts.

It was midsummer. The day was bright and the grass was green…

They set off to the sound of horns, the two kings at the front of the party.

It was a glorious hunt. The archeresses were swift and the swordsmen strong. They returned to  the golden halls of the council meeting place, arms laden, carts groaning with bounty. 

The hunting party crossed the threshold of the golden gates and the revelry began anew. Cooks and wives streamed out  to greet the warriors and take their bounty off to the kitchens for preparation.  When the din finally fell to a lull, The Wicker King turned to clasp his brother in pride and saw that he was not there.

The people searched the hunting party for The King of The Wood, but he was not among them. They sent search parties back out into the dark. In spite of their efforts, they found nothing…

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For those of you who are wondering what that art is related to.

My shitty stand-in art for the Wicker Throne’s fairytale: The Legend of The Golden Raven

Its more sketch quality than anything. and I don’t have a tablet, so I had to draw everything by hand and then fix it up in photoship with that shitty square you use instead of a mouse.

ugggghhhhhhhhhhhhh

saucymerbabe:

I swear, if this fandom spends one more ounce of energy despising and shitting on Sansa while lauding and romanticizing Jaime I’m going to hunt you all down and fucking hang you upside down by your fucking pinky toes.

Coraline, wait! The mice asked me to give you message. They are saying, “Do not go through little door.” Do you know such a thing?

medieval-women:

Empress Matilda
Princess of England, Holy Roman Empress, Duchess of Normandy and Countess of Anjou
Born c. 7 February 1102 – Died 10 September 1167
Claim to fame: a fiery woman who militarily defended her family’s claim to the English throne, becoming the first female ruler of the Kingdom of England
Matilda was the daughter of King Henry I of England and Matilda of Scotland. At roughly eight years old, Matilda was betrothed and sent to Germany to marry Henry V, the Holy Roman Emperor. From rough beginnings, Matilda became a respected figure in the Empire and acted as regent in Italy from around 1117 to 1119.
In 1120, Matilda’s brother drowned, making her the king’s only legitimate child. As a female heir she was disadvantaged and the succession was uncertain. Her husband died in 1125, leaving Matilda a widow at the age of 23 with no children. Henry I declared Matilda his heiress presumptive, made his court swear allegiance to her, and arranged a strategic marriage with Geoffrey V, Count of Anjou, a boy of 15 who was well below her station. The marriage produced three sons despite being stormy with frequent long separations.
When Henry I died in 1135, the throne was usurped by Matilda’s cousin, Stephen of Blois, who moved quickly and successfully to claim leadership. Their rivalry for the throne led to years of unrest and civil war in England known as ‘the Anarchy’. Stories tell of Matilda’s daring escapes during the civil war, fleeing across snow-covered land in a white cape, or posing as a corpse being carried out for burial.
Matilda became the first female ruler of the Kingdom of England in 1141 when her forces imprisoned King Stephen. Although he was effectively deposed, Matilda’s advantage lasted only a few months as she was never crowned and failed to legally or politically consolidate her rule. For this reason, she is normally excluded from lists of English monarchs, with her rival Stephen listed as monarch from 1135 to 1154.
In 1154, after years of campaigning for her oldest son’s inheritance, Matilda saw him ascend the throne as King Henry II of England. She died in 1167 and her epitaph reads: ”Great by Birth, Greater by Marriage, Greatest in her Offspring: Here lies Matilda, the daughter, wife, and mother of Henry.”

medieval-women:

Empress Matilda

Princess of England, Holy Roman Empress, Duchess of Normandy and Countess of Anjou

Born c. 7 February 1102 – Died 10 September 1167

Claim to fame: a fiery woman who militarily defended her family’s claim to the English throne, becoming the first female ruler of the Kingdom of England

Matilda was the daughter of King Henry I of England and Matilda of Scotland. At roughly eight years old, Matilda was betrothed and sent to Germany to marry Henry V, the Holy Roman Emperor. From rough beginnings, Matilda became a respected figure in the Empire and acted as regent in Italy from around 1117 to 1119.

In 1120, Matilda’s brother drowned, making her the king’s only legitimate child. As a female heir she was disadvantaged and the succession was uncertain. Her husband died in 1125, leaving Matilda a widow at the age of 23 with no children. Henry I declared Matilda his heiress presumptive, made his court swear allegiance to her, and arranged a strategic marriage with Geoffrey V, Count of Anjou, a boy of 15 who was well below her station. The marriage produced three sons despite being stormy with frequent long separations.

When Henry I died in 1135, the throne was usurped by Matilda’s cousin, Stephen of Blois, who moved quickly and successfully to claim leadership. Their rivalry for the throne led to years of unrest and civil war in England known as ‘the Anarchy’. Stories tell of Matilda’s daring escapes during the civil war, fleeing across snow-covered land in a white cape, or posing as a corpse being carried out for burial.

Matilda became the first female ruler of the Kingdom of England in 1141 when her forces imprisoned King Stephen. Although he was effectively deposed, Matilda’s advantage lasted only a few months as she was never crowned and failed to legally or politically consolidate her rule. For this reason, she is normally excluded from lists of English monarchs, with her rival Stephen listed as monarch from 1135 to 1154.

In 1154, after years of campaigning for her oldest son’s inheritance, Matilda saw him ascend the throne as King Henry II of England. She died in 1167 and her epitaph reads: ”Great by Birth, Greater by Marriage, Greatest in her Offspring: Here lies Matilda, the daughter, wife, and mother of Henry.”

amazonpoodle:

what if the reason nobody can tell fred and george apart is because they really are interchangeable

not in a ~it doesn’t matter~ way but like. molly and arthur used to worry that fred and george might turn out to be squibs because they weren’t doing any accidental magic as children, but they were, THEY TOTALLY WERE, it just wasn’t anything flashy, instead they were just like idly switching bodies all the time

and like sometimes it doesn’t make much of a difference, whatever, wake up in the opposite bed you went to sleep in, but it gets like dangerous and weird if you’re on a broom or in the pond or letting your mum teach you to cook or trying to be mad stealth, so for a long long time everybody presumes they’re clumsy maybe-squibs and that they’re doing their twin lying thing when they try to explain what’s going on, so they learn to handle the issue their ownselves

they just. don’t go anywhere without the other. they start each day deciding which body is going to be which (because at this point they really don’t know which body is technically fred and which is technically george), and they learn to reorient FAST when they switch, and what things set them off, and eventually they learn how to act like nothing’s up even when one of them’s in the air and one’s on the ground or whatever, and then they burn past that til they can finish each other’s sentences — til they can switch midsentence — til they can play beater together — til they can switch in a split second in the middle of a game — til there’s room for other kinds of accidental magic to start showing up

at hogwarts they keep each other awake in history of magic by switching back and forth. in potions they take turns brewing and keeping lookout for the slytherins. in transfiguration and charms they keep their grades up because one of them will always get a spell right on the first try so they switch and make it look like both of them do and then they practice on their own later in private. it keeps the mystery alive.

at first they thought lee was just a lucky guesser but no, lee can always tell one twin from another twin — it’s not exactly telling fred from george, because while they are definitely two distinct personalities neither one of them feels like fred all the time or george all the time — but lee knows who he argued with yesterday or who he lent his notes to or who’s best to ask for help in astronomy and who’s best at runes. 

the weasleys are pretty bad at it for the longest time, but then bill comes home from his first year cursebreaking and he can tell, and over a holiday he teaches his trick to charlie so charlie can tell. alicia and katie and angelina can tell. the twins honestly don’t know if oliver can tell or not; so long as they’re doing what they’re supposed to on the quidditch pitch he doesn’t really care about much else. harry can tell. luna can tell. tonks can tell.

the problem is there’s no way for this to end happily

*violent crying*

Since They changed Philosopher’s Stone to Sorcerer’s Stone for America, I decided to change the rest since us American’s are too dumb to understand the word philosopher:

superpoisonivy:

ehehehelokid:

spudsexuall:

Harry Potter and The Whisper Snake Place

Harry Potter and That Mean Jail Man

Harry Potter and The Hot Cup

Harry Potter and The Bird Club

Harry Potter and The Guy With Only Some Blood

Harry Potter and Death 

it all makes sense now

I’m crying.

books-gloriousbooks:

thelesstraveledroad:

Genre: Dystopia

Oh look, a dystopian literature list that isn’t riddled with nothing but YA. I approve.

langleav:

SUPER SPECIAL! Love & Misadventure just $11.33! Kindle version only $6.70! HURRY! Get a copy for you or a friend from Amazon today.  xo Lang