10,000 posts!
I am unsure whether to be proud or embarrassed. 

10,000 posts!

I am unsure whether to be proud or embarrassed. 

Nietzsche is dead

God, 1900 (via wishinfoolius)

RUDE.

exorcist-taylor-kaine:

themalfoymistress:

ilikepotatoess:

m0iety:

Hyperstealth is a Canadian company that has recently developed a material that bends light waves around a target that allows for complete invisibility labeled “Quantum Stealth”. The material removes not only your visual, infrared (night vision) and thermal signatures but also the target’s shadow.

fucking canada made the invisibility cloak

image

Why would you name it “quantum stealth” when you could just name it “invisibility cloak”

coconutmilk83:

Into The Woods | 2014 ()

elloellenoh:

disabilityinkidlit:

goldenheartedrose:

dysfunctionalqueer:

goldenheartedrose:

weneeddiversebooks:

justsitstill:

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, try Marcelo in the  Real World by Francesco X. Stork because both are fabulous stories about autism spectrum boys finding their way in the world.

I don’t agree with how the characters in these books are described as “autism spectrum boys.” A more inclusive description would be, “boys with autism spectrum disorder.” Generally, when referring to an individual with an exceptionality or special needs, don’t say “_____ boy/girl/person/etc.”, say “boy/girl/person/etc. with _____.” The former description erases the fact that the person is a unique individual on their own; instead they become their exceptionality first and then a person after.
Moreover, one of the reasons I love Marcelo in the Real World so much is because it’s not a book that features a character with ASD and then proceeds to point at the fact that he has autism for the entire book. When you read the book, it’s not like you’re left with the impression that all Marcelo has to offer to the story is his ASD. No- this story is about Marcelo, who has many facets to his personhood, trying to come to terms with complicated moral questions.
I just think it’s important to think about the words we use and how we use them.
But, regardless, I’m happy that the We Need Diverse Books team is bringing this wonderful novel to the attention of more people! Seriously, it’s a must read!

Good point! Thank you for clarifying!

I’m going to disagree 100% with justsitstill. The autistic community in general prefers to not use person-first language in referring to ourselves and each other. We say “autistic person”, and we don’t say “person with autism”. Autism colors our lives in a way that can’t be easily separated. That doesn’t mean that it’s the only thing about us, but if you wouldn’t say “person with queerness/gayness” or “person with womanhood” or “person with blondeness”, don’t use “person with autism” either. Side note: You will still find many educators, especially in the fields of teaching/childcare/social work/psychology will still use “person with autism” or “person with x disability” instead of “autistic” or “disabled”. But that doesn’t make them right. Here are some links:http://autisticadvocacy.org/identity-first-language/http://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=identity+first+language+autism+community&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart&sa=X&ei=zX7aU56-A5CzyASrsIKgBg&ved=0CBsQgQMwAAhttp://yesthattoo.blogspot.com/p/dont-call-me-person-with-autism.html

Also The Curious Incident of the Boy and Nighttime is a terrible ableist book about autistic people. I personally find it appaling that it’s considered a good representation of an autistic character. 

Yes, it really really is. However, I think the fact that the book is popular is why it’s being used as a launching off point to recommend the second book, which is a lot better (so I’ve heard from other autistic folks).

Ah! I see that someone else has also made this point already.
With regards to Marcelo in the Real World, s.e. smith reviewed this novel for Disability in Kidlit last year. Conclusion: mostly a thumbs up!
I personally reviewed it as well and was somewhat less enthused.
Both these reviews are by autistic people, as is Disability in Kidlit policy. 

The dialogue that is happening is so important that we have to repost it. Thank you all for contributing to this discussion so that we all can learn from it.

elloellenoh:

disabilityinkidlit:

goldenheartedrose:

dysfunctionalqueer:

goldenheartedrose:

weneeddiversebooks:

justsitstill:

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, try Marcelo in the  Real World by Francesco X. Stork because both are fabulous stories about autism spectrum boys finding their way in the world.

I don’t agree with how the characters in these books are described as “autism spectrum boys.” A more inclusive description would be, “boys with autism spectrum disorder.” Generally, when referring to an individual with an exceptionality or special needs, don’t say “_____ boy/girl/person/etc.”, say “boy/girl/person/etc. with _____.” The former description erases the fact that the person is a unique individual on their own; instead they become their exceptionality first and then a person after.

Moreover, one of the reasons I love Marcelo in the Real World so much is because it’s not a book that features a character with ASD and then proceeds to point at the fact that he has autism for the entire book. When you read the book, it’s not like you’re left with the impression that all Marcelo has to offer to the story is his ASD. No- this story is about Marcelo, who has many facets to his personhood, trying to come to terms with complicated moral questions.

I just think it’s important to think about the words we use and how we use them.

But, regardless, I’m happy that the We Need Diverse Books team is bringing this wonderful novel to the attention of more people! Seriously, it’s a must read!

Good point! Thank you for clarifying!

I’m going to disagree 100% with justsitstill. The autistic community in general prefers to not use person-first language in referring to ourselves and each other. We say “autistic person”, and we don’t say “person with autism”. Autism colors our lives in a way that can’t be easily separated. That doesn’t mean that it’s the only thing about us, but if you wouldn’t say “person with queerness/gayness” or “person with womanhood” or “person with blondeness”, don’t use “person with autism” either.

Side note: You will still find many educators, especially in the fields of teaching/childcare/social work/psychology will still use “person with autism” or “person with x disability” instead of “autistic” or “disabled”. But that doesn’t make them right.

Here are some links:

http://autisticadvocacy.org/identity-first-language/

http://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=identity+first+language+autism+community&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart&sa=X&ei=zX7aU56-A5CzyASrsIKgBg&ved=0CBsQgQMwAA

http://yesthattoo.blogspot.com/p/dont-call-me-person-with-autism.html

Also The Curious Incident of the Boy and Nighttime is a terrible ableist book about autistic people. I personally find it appaling that it’s considered a good representation of an autistic character. 

Yes, it really really is. However, I think the fact that the book is popular is why it’s being used as a launching off point to recommend the second book, which is a lot better (so I’ve heard from other autistic folks).

Ah! I see that someone else has also made this point already.

With regards to Marcelo in the Real World, s.e. smith reviewed this novel for Disability in Kidlit last year. Conclusion: mostly a thumbs up!

I personally reviewed it as well and was somewhat less enthused.

Both these reviews are by autistic people, as is Disability in Kidlit policy. 

The dialogue that is happening is so important that we have to repost it. Thank you all for contributing to this discussion so that we all can learn from it.

WAIT WAIT LISTEN TO WHAT IM SAYING

claudiastilinskis:

So Dylan O’Brien is an actor. Dylan O’Brien is also buddies with John Green.

Dylan O’Brien is starring in a movie adaption of a famous book. John Green writes famous books, one of which has turned into a movie. John Green will probably start looking for actors for more book to movie adaptions. 

Do you see where I’m going with this. 

Ugh no Dylan deserves better.

Someone put him in a real movie where he can build an amazing serious film career that involves things other than making teenaged girls cry.

Like making grown men cry.

Someone put Dylan O ‘Brian in a WAR FILM.

Maybe the world had been bad to its great and unusual women. Maybe there wasn’t a worthy place for the female hero to live out her golden years, to be celebrated as the men had been celebrated, to take from the celebration what she needed to survive.
"Who Killed Dolly Wilde?" by Megan Mayhew Bergman, in ALMOST FAMOUS WOMEN (Scribner, January 2015)
“She wanted, passionately and persistently, two things which she believed should subsist together in any well-ordered life: amusement and respectability.” Wharton, The Custom of the Country, 1913. To escape the heat, Wharton, Henry James (Jeffrey Eugenides, left) & Morton Fullerton (Jack Huston, right), motored over the hills and valleys, her chauffeur, Cook (actor Elijah Wood) at the wheel. Nothing would have interested James more than watching his two friends Wharton and Fullerton as they circled each other. Anna Bahlmann (actress Juno Temple, near left) was Wharton’s faithful secretary and lifelong confidante. Nearby Chesterwood was the country home and studio of dear friend and sculptor Daniel Chester French (artist Nate Lowman, center), who would go on to design the statue for the Lincoln Memorial statue. From L: niece, Beatrix Farrand (Mamie Gummer); James; diplomat Walter Berry (Junot Díaz); Fullerton; architect Ogden Codman, Jr. (Jonathan Safran Foer); painter Maxfield Parrish (actor Max Minghella). Wharton shared with her friend Theodore Roosevelt (actor James Corden, center) a personal vigor,self-discipline, and fighting spirit that seemed uniquely American. With Fullerton, Wharton revealed a side of herself—vulnerable, passionate—usually reserved for her characters. Despite personal feelings, James encouraged the affair, writing, “Live it all through.

yeahwriters:

This is probably the coolest photoshoot that has ever been created.

All of the photos were taken at Edith Wharton’s summer home, The Mount, and all of the characters in the photos are supposed to be Edith and contemporaries who were part of her “circle”. I put in the original captions from the Vogue shoot*. I also love that these real people are portrayed by artists, writers, actors, and models, including Junot Diaz, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Elijah Wood.

I wish that they’d make a movie based on an Edith Wharton book where the costumes looked like these—based on the period dress, but not perfectly authentic so as to allow some contemporary influence (omg wait though, I just found this photo of Edith where she’s wearing that dress with the crazy stripes!!!). It’d be awesome if the music was modern too… think Moulin Rouge, or what The Great Gatsby movie could’ve been. Ugh it’d be so good!!!

If you’re a writer and haven’t read Edith Wharton yet, seriously drop what you’re doing and pick up House of Mirth or The Age of Innocence or even just a collection of her shorts stories (unless you want every piece of contemporary literature you read to seem like total garbage, because that’s what her writing will do to you). Her use of language is impeccable; every single sentence is absolutely perfect. I’m reading The Custom of the Country right now (I’m making my way through her entire collected works; I’m on C and literally every story is just home run amazing) and I have to imagine that she just sat down and these stories poured forth from her, because the idea of having to go back and edit these complex plots and interactions and crazy scaffolding of inter-character relationships and structure seems so daunting that I can’t even imagine that process would be possible. And her writing is so perfect that it does seem like she had these entire stories in her head from start to finish when she sat down to write them.

I guess you could say you’d like Edith Wharton if you like Jane Austen, Kate Chopin, or Virginia Woolf, because so much of the action happens inside of the characters’ heads, but I think she blows those women out of the water. Her subject matter is also somewhat unique because she was part of the high society of New York City around the turn of the century (think of the glitz and glamour of Gatsby, but just a little bit earlier) and was willing to write about all of the crazy social rules that people abided by at that time. I love reading about what Manhattan was like at that time… in one story there’s a young unmarried woman who very scandalously lives alone in “that artist’s neighborhood full of Bohemians”, the East Village, which is where I live. Wharton could write about lower class people too—her most famous book about “peasants” is Ethan Frome. Most of her books are love stories or involve strong women revolting against the institution of marriage—Wharton’s time in history was a strange one, as women were still married off as part of what was basically a business deal, but people also were starting to get divorces. But a lot of her social commentary—on not just relationships, but wealthy, celebrity, the family unit, etc.—are still really relevant today, which makes the books so timeless (people sometimes say that Gossip Girl draws from Edith Wharton’s books, although Gossip Girl makes all of these interpersonal relationship problems seem super trite, whereas Wharton masterfully makes them seem as serious to the reader as they are to her characters.) But her books are full of lots and lots of scandal, and equally as many badass heroines. 

Okay, that’s the end of my gushing, but seriously, just reading her will make you a better writer, I swear. 

*What they didn’t note about the Wharton/James/Fullterton friendship in the captions was that Henry James was also in love with Fullerton, so the 3 of them may or may not have had some kind of ménage à trois (it seems to have been, at the very least, an intellectual one). If you find you like Wharton, you’ll like James too, as his work influenced hers and vise versa. James’ The Turn of the Screw is seriously the scariest book I’ve ever read.